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Old 05-07-14, 12:12
Riaz Riaz is offline
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Default The National Curriculum and demographic diversity

Is England demographically too diverse to have a National Curriculum that effectively caters for all?

If the school curriculum was developed on a local authority by local authority basis (apart from possibly a national core content of English language and maths) then would it result in large inconsistencies that could be detrimental?
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Old 05-07-14, 13:17
Dad23 Dad23 is offline
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Forget LAs. Every class is too diverse for a National Curriculum as every child's individual needs, abilities and interests are best catered for via a curriculum devised exclusively for that child (subject, of course, to some common, core/basic skills).
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Old 05-07-14, 13:53
Riaz Riaz is offline
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Forget LAs. Every class is too diverse for a National Curriculum as every child's individual needs, abilities and interests are best catered for via a curriculum devised exclusively for that child (subject, of course, to some common, core/basic skills).
I already know that one but as the school institution cannot match every child's individual need I asked the question on a LA basis. Following a discussion with a former teacher a damning criticism to the National Curriculum on the basis of demographic diversity from one LA to another could be brewing.
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Old 05-07-14, 18:56
Polly Polly is offline
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What demographic are you referring to?

Class?
Income?
Ethnicity?

Because to gear your teaching to these would do a grave disservice to children who don't reflect the general demographic of their local area.

In fact you can't designate any local authority as a certain demographic.

In addition, I have known teachers who are ill informed and basically ignorant, except for the subject they teach, as well as highly erudite ones . I also know highly educated factory workers - one has a first class honours degree in the classics, yet works on the factory 'floor'.

Your question appears to assume that the population of a local authority area will be homogeneous, however this isn't the case, even people who work at the same job are too diverse to generalise about them, so a local population will be more so.

The big problem for any education service is that those it is inflicted on are individuals with only their ages in common. State education also doesn't allow for differences in maturity, both physical and mental.
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Old 06-07-14, 09:09
Dad23 Dad23 is offline
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What demographic are you referring to?

Class?
Income?
Ethnicity?
Riaz could have meant nationality. The single largest recent change to school demographics is the sharp rise in children whose parents hail from Poland and other east European countries.
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Old 06-07-14, 12:05
Riaz Riaz is offline
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The single largest recent change to school demographics is the sharp rise in children whose parents hail from Poland and other east European countries.
And it's not gone down well with many teachers, or parents, or parents of children with SEN who see resources diverted from them onto children who can't understand English. A free movement of school children in the EU is a fatally flawed strategy because of language barrier between nations. It's not like the United States where every state uses English and only the accent differs.

It's also why a single EU market in TV programmes doesn't exist. Count the number of times you see European TV programmes on the mainstream terrestrial channels and then compare this with the number of American programmes.
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Old 06-07-14, 13:30
Riaz Riaz is offline
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What demographic are you referring to?
Class?
Income?
Ethnicity?
Everything. Even matters relating to technology (such as the proportion of children with broadband at home) and the local terrain, such as mountainous or coastal areas.

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Because to gear your teaching to these would do a grave disservice to children who don't reflect the general demographic of their local area.

In fact you can't designate any local authority as a certain demographic.
I have already discussed these and similar matters in depth. Divided and diverse demographics within LA add many variables into an already complex equation.

If every LA could set its own curriculum then it's undeniable that they will become evolving projects each evolving in its own unique and separate way. Also take into account local political influence and the way in which councils don't always reflect the demographic make up of the territory they govern.

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The big problem for any education service is that those it is inflicted on are individuals with only their ages in common. State education also doesn't allow for differences in maturity, both physical and mental.
This has been one of my talking points continuously since I was at primary school myself. It's also a major factor as to why I did badly at school but later managed to achieve good A Levels and an electronic engineering degree.
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