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Old 02-08-14, 08:03
Mayfly Mayfly is offline
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The Herald Scotland has a pro ID Card piece today:

Personal details are more than passwords
http://www.heraldscotland.com/commen...words.24904445

Quote:
A national ID card scheme may seem Orwellian to some, but in an age when we're all anonymous, tapping away on an iPad that could just as easily be in Newton Mearns or New Delhi, we must accept that old methods of personal verification are broken and that we need a new system.

If the government doesn't provide such a system then the private sector will surely step in. Personally, I'd be more comfortable with my public records being tied to a national ID card than to my Google account.
The assumption being that Government is always completely benign . . .
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Old 02-08-14, 08:03
Mayfly Mayfly is offline
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[Copied from the Data Loss thread as this is such an important issue]

The Herald Scotland has a pro ID Card piece today:

Personal details are more than passwords
http://www.heraldscotland.com/commen...words.24904445

Quote:
A national ID card scheme may seem Orwellian to some, but in an age when we're all anonymous, tapping away on an iPad that could just as easily be in Newton Mearns or New Delhi, we must accept that old methods of personal verification are broken and that we need a new system.

If the government doesn't provide such a system then the private sector will surely step in. Personally, I'd be more comfortable with my public records being tied to a national ID card than to my Google account.
The assumption being that Government is always completely benign . . .
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Old 02-08-14, 19:24
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llondel llondel is offline
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[Copied from the Data Loss thread as this is such an important issue]

They also miss the point that at the moment it is entirely voluntary to give your details to Google, although it's hard to opt out. If the government mandates that you hand over the information then opting out gets a lot harder.

I don't use Gmail, or any of the other large providers, for my personal email. If someone wants to read it then they've either got to get it from the other end, intercept it in transit or come talk to me.
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Old 04-08-14, 06:54
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Default The Data Protection thread

[Copied from the Data Loss thread as this is such an important issue]

Worse is this latest Whitehall plan to share all our data:

Revealed: Whitehall plans to share your private data
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/poli...vate-data.html

Quote:
Details of the financial history, qualifications and property wealth of millions of Britons could be shared across Whitehall for the first time without their consent, the Telegraph can disclose.

Information including voters’ driving licences, criminal records, energy use and even whether they use a bus pass could be shared under a radical blueprint to link up thousands of state databases used by schools, councils, police and civil servants.

. . . Ministers believe the ability to aggregate and “mine” citizens’ data under a new legal framework will allow them to better monitor economic growth and population movements, identify troubled families and elderly people in need of support, and cut fraud.
What's really worrying is that they are apparently planning some kind of change to Data Protection laws:

Quote:
The proposals, drawn up by Francis Maude, will be contained in a White Paper published in the Autumn. It may feature draft legislation for introduction after the 2015 election, according to sources.

. . . At present, people’s personal information is governed by the Data Protection Act and a web of legislation, often decades old, that underpins different government bodies – making it all but impossible for it to be shared outside one department without the specific investigatory powers granted to police and tax inspectors.
This could be something to do with repealing the Human Rights Act and creating a Bill of Rights. Either way this is a particularly worrying piece in the Telegraph - not least because it was David Cameron who ensured the ID Cards Act was repealed and it now appears he's been got at too . . .
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Old 04-08-14, 08:28
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Sheila Struthers Sheila Struthers is offline
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A single view of the citizen.

Looks like a done deal to me...
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Old 04-08-14, 09:04
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Thanks for giving this a thread all of its own...it will be valuable to have someone like yourself following the legal niceties of what is to happen to the Data Protection Act.

As I said on the other thread, looks like a done deal to me...
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Old 04-08-14, 09:10
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As you can see from this Whitehall got it's opponents round the table early:

Planning the open policy process | 31 Mar 2014 | Meeting note

http://datasharing.org.uk/2014/04/03...-meeting-note/

Curious that NO2ID were there and that their website no longer accepts comments.
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Old 04-08-14, 10:04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayfly View Post

Planning the open policy process | 31 Mar 2014 | Meeting note

http://datasharing.org.uk/2014/04/03...-meeting-note/
Justification for bypassing consent?

Quote:
Public often think that if one part of government has data then the whole of government has it." They’re surprised government’s not doing it already.
Communication / transparency

Quote:
It was questioned how the “outside world” should be informed that the process was happening, with suggestions about communicating the process to the media and involving the public in discussions.
Representation

Quote:
Questions were raised regarding the power of representatives to represent their organisations in discussions. Linked to this were questions about how “sign-off” would take place – who would need to sign off papers, when and how? It was agreed that there would be a parallel sign-off process in Government and civil society. Also connected to this were conversations over who should write the papers, with the suggestion put forward that the Cabinet Office should draft and then circulate for comments.
Naivete thy name is 'civil society
Quote:
There was some concern raised over the tailored public services proposals. Clarity was needed over how, why, and what for data would be used. Government needed to be transparent about where it wants to do things to people. There also needed to be some firm examples of where data sharing is necessary.

It was stated that the trend seemed to be that government wanted to share data about vulnerable people, which raised the question of whether this is paternalistic? And if not, is it going to apply to everyone else?
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Old 04-08-14, 10:46
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Default Government IT expert is caught with child porn stash

...but why did Downing Street keep it secret for six months?

Quote:
Police discovered indecent images were being streamed from Mr Crump’s home computer IP address in April last year.
But incredibly last November – while he was still being investigated – he received a promotion at the Cabinet Office, where he had previously worked in internal communications.
When Crump, 39, was arrested in January this year Scotland Yard did not publicise the arrest. He was only named when he was charged last month, but even then the Metropolitan Police did not reveal his role at the Cabinet Office.
Details can only now be revealed after he pleaded guilty to four charges of making and distributing indecent images of children.
Yesterday Crump – who has spent a decade working in technology and communications for Government offices, including the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Central Office of Information – insisted: ‘I’m not a paedophile.’
The case has reignited a row over secret arrests by police involving government officials accused of child porn offences.
Lib Dem MP John Hemming said: ‘When they sat on the case for such a long time and then hid the fact that he is a senior civil servant, it causes great concern.
It does raise serious questions and alarm bells are ringing loudly.’ The Cabinet Secretary has already been asked to investigate the handling of a separate arrest of one of David Cameron’s closest aides.
Patrick Rock, deputy director of the No 10 policy unit, was arrested on suspicion of hoarding images of naked children in February.
The National Crime Agency refused to confirm or deny Mr Rock had been held or the existence of any inquiry, which was finally revealed by this newspaper.
Mr Rock was brought in to Downing Street as deputy head of policy in 2011, and was involved in drawing up Government policy on tackling online child abuse images.
Although Sebastian Crump’s work did not involve any child protection issues, the Mail can reveal he landed a government job after working as a children’s charity website manager.
The IT expert worked for Action for Children, which helps support vulnerable and neglected children, between 1998 and 1999.
Last year while he was under investigation, he shared a picture on his Facebook page urging 11-year-old children to be safe on the internet.
City of Westminster Magistrates Court heard that Crump hoarded nearly 400 indecent images of children, 82 of which were classed as the most extreme.
At his £800,000 terraced home in Wandsworth, South London, police found 375 images and video files involving child and animal abuse.
The court heard that Crump’s marriage had collapsed following his arrest. He pleaded guilty on Thursday to three counts of making an indecent image of a child and one count of distributing an indecent photograph of a child.
But yesterday Crump insisted he was not a paedophile.


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Old 05-08-14, 07:51
Dad23 Dad23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by llondel View Post
I don't use Gmail, or any of the other large providers, for my personal email.
Quite rightly too. In today's news Google shopped someone to the police for having images of child abuse in his gmail account. Google's software apparently automatically scans for stuff like that. What next? You get reported for a misdeclaration on your tax return, for an email admission that you've driven over the speed limit or for lying to your boss about the reason for your day off yesterday?
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