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  #31  
Old 20-11-10, 18:20
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The Charles Dickens Museum has secured funding of £2m from the Heritage Lottery Fund for Great Expectations, a major redevelopment project to radically change and increase display areas and improve the overall visitor experience at the Museum in Doughty Street, London, for the bicentenary of Dickens’s birth in 2012.
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There is a
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Screenshot of fun page on 2012 site
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  #32  
Old 22-11-10, 18:32
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Default Birmingham in the Blitz

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From the
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Birmingham in the Blitz stories

Undaunted, Brum stands up to raids
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School project spans the generation gap
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'Make do and mend' clothing
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Raids that rocked Birmingham
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'Pigs in blankets' hidden from cop
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Read more stories
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Birmingham in the Blitz memories
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Carl Chinn column: Remembering the Birmingham Small Arms Company Nov 20 2010
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Your Blitz: For me, it didn't all end in tragedy
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Your Blitz: We knew we'd been hit and sat in silence
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Your Blitz: Rescued by my own unknown hero
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Mum and dad got married.. next day they were building Spitfires
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Birmingham in the Blitz: Wylde Green resident recalls role of his family in the war
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More memories of the blitz

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THE term ‘pigs in blankets’ has never been more apt than during the Blitz.

So precious a commodity was pork, as all meats were, that those living through the war effort were forced to tell the odd porky.

It was not uncommon, amid the constraints of food rationing, for neighbours to grow their own produce or keep their own livestock.

All piglets produced had to be registered by the Ministry of Food which would send an inspector out whenever offspring were due.


The Ministry would expect a maximum batch of 11 piglets for each birth to then be distributed among people in the area.

So when owners were fortunate enough to have reared a prolific pig, delivering more than 11, the extras were not declared and hidden from inspectors.

Quite how did people manage to conceal a young pig?

John Marvin, 71, from Aldridge, was reliably informed of the answer in later life by his mother.

He explained: “The men used to ask the women to put the pigs into a pram and walk them around for a few hours until the inspectors had gone.”

But it wasn’t quite that simple.

For newborn pigs squeal every bit as much as the grown-ups.

“To stop them squealing They used to dose them up with cough medicine. It used to knock the piglets out,” said John.

This meaty scam did not go entirely unnoticed as the local bobby would usually be tipped off by a member of the community.

“The local policeman and pub landlord, who were powerful members of the community in those days, would know all about the extras,’ said John

“Quite often the policeman would leave with a leg and the landlord some fillets.

“The rest was shared out – you couldn’t really disguise cooking pork because of the smell
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  #33  
Old 09-12-10, 22:48
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Between Magna Carta and the Parliamentary State: The fine rolls of King Henry III 1216–1272 and the project

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A fine in the reign of King Henry III (1216–1272) was an agreement to pay the king a sum of money for a specified concession. The rolls on which the fines were recorded provide the earliest systematic evidence of what people and institutions across society wanted from the king and he was prepared to give. They open a large window onto the politics, government, economy and society of England in the hinge period between the establishment of Magna Carta at the start of Henry’s reign and the parliamentary state which was emerging at its end. This Project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, makes the rolls freely available to a wide audience while at the same time, in the Fine of the Month feature, providing regular comment on their historical interest.
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All the rolls have translation pages
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Link can from @KedlestonDerby
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His Medieval history website - Kedleston.org.uk
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  #34  
Old 27-12-10, 02:09
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Default CIA decodes Civil War message in a bottle after 147 years

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A message in a bottle sent to a Confederate general during the Siege of Vicksburg, one of the key turning points of the American Civil War, has finally been deciphered after 147 years.
The glass vial stopped with a cork contained a coded missive to Lt Gen John C Pemberton, who was besieged in the Mississippi city by Union forces led by Ulysses S Grant.
After nearly six weeks people in Vicksburg had resorted to eating cats, dogs and leather, and making soup from wallpaper paste.
The encrypted, six line message was dated July 4, 1863, the date of Pemberton's surrender, and would have offered no hope to him. It said: "You can expect no help from this side of the river."
The source of the message is thought to have been Maj Gen John G. Walker, of the Texas Division.
Pemberton had also held out hope that General Joseph E Johnston, and his 32,000 Confederate troops camped south of Vicksburg, would eventually come to his aid, but Walker's message made clear that was not going to happen.
Catherine Wright, collections manager at the Museum of the Confederacy, said: "He's saying 'I can't help you. I have no troops, I have no supplies, I have no way to get over there.'
"It was just another punctuation mark to just how desperate and dire everything was."
The bottle also contained a bullet, which was thought to have been to weigh it down if the messenger was caught and had to throw it in a river.
It had been kept in the museum since 1896 before being opened. The message initially appeared to be a random collection of letters but was deciphered after several weeks by David Gaddy, a retired CIA code breaker.
It had been drawn up using the Vigenere cipher, which involves shifting letters of the alphabet a set number of places.
Vicksburg was so scarred by the siege that it refused to celebrate July 4 for the next 80 years.
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  #35  
Old 09-02-11, 13:33
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DS stumbled across this site while researching Juilias Ceasar. Quite nicely laid out with topics spanning from ancient Rome to the Vietnam War and beyond.

http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/index.htm
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  #36  
Old 28-03-11, 16:05
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Default Niall Ferguson "lesson plan"

This landed in my inbox

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  #37  
Old 27-05-11, 17:44
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Default The Manchester Guardian

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A chance to see today's news presented 1821 style in
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screenshot
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  #38  
Old 27-05-11, 20:40
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Love it.
Text only rules.
(Ya bass.)

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  #39  
Old 06-07-11, 09:07
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During WW II Lockheed (unbelievable 1940s pictures). This is a version of special effects during the 1940's. I have never seen these pictures or knew that we had gone this far to protect ourselves. During World War II the Army Corps of Engineers needed to hide the Lockheed Burbank Aircraft Plant to protect it from a possible Japanese air attack. They covered it with camouflage netting to make it look like a rural subdivision from the air.....more....
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There are many photo's of which these Before and After shots are awesome .
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Before

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After

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  #40  
Old 11-07-11, 21:42
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The history of Katla Volcano in Iceland

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Once it happened that the Abbot of the Monastery of Thykkvabœ had a housekeeper whose name was Katla, and who was an evil-minded and hot-tempered woman. She possessed a pair of shoes whose peculiarity was, that whoever put them on was never tired of running. Everybody was afraid of Katla’s bad disposition and fierce temper, even the Abbot himself. The herdsman of the monastery farm, whose name was Bardi, was often dreadfully ill-treated by her, particularly if he had chanced to lose any of the ewes.

One day in the autumn the Abbot and his housekeeper went to a wedding, leaving orders with Bardi to drive in the sheep and milk them before they came home. But unhappily, when the time came, the herdsman could not find all the ewes; so he went into the house, put on Katla’s magic shoes, and sallied out in search of the stray sheep. He had a long way to run before he discovered them, but felt no fatigue, so drove all the flock in quite briskly.

When Katla returned, she immediately perceived that the herdsman had been using her shoes, so she took him and drowned him in a large tubful of curds. Nobody knew what had become of the man, and as the winter went on, and the curds in the tub sank lower and lower, Katla was heard to say these words to herself: ‘Soon will the waves of milk break upon the foot-soles of Bardi!’

Shortly after this, dreading that the murder should be found out, and that she should be condemned to death, she took her magic shoes, and ran from the monastery to a great ice-mountain, into a rift of which she leaped, and was never seen again.

As soon as she had disappeared, a fearful eruption took place from the mountain, and the lava rolled down and destroyed the monastery at which she had lived. People declared that her witchcraft had been the cause of this, and called the crater of the mountain, ‘The Rift of Katla’.

Jón Arnason, ‘The Legend of Katla’, from Icelandic Legends (London: Richard Bentley, 1864), pp. 134-5.
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